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5 Steps to a Successful Career Transition

The days of working a single job or at the same company for 20 years is a thing of the past. Career transitions can take place for a number of reasons. Since the mortgage bubble rocked the country in 2008, a number of corporate executives and senior managers have involuntarily been forced into some sort of career transition. While your career goals and aspirations might have changed, you still have the opportunity to attain the success you were experiencing in your former role. This career interruption doesn’t have to be the end of your long-term goals, but it will require a new approach to work and the right attitude. Use this transition as a chance to decide what you really want to do next. Consider what you enjoy doing, so that it doesn’t feel like a job at all. Flexibility, ability to work at home, spend more time with your children, spouse or ailing parents, are all factors to consider in making your decision.

Before you dive head first into search mode, take the necessary time to assess any and all options, and make sure that the position is a fit for the lifestyle you are wanting to resume, maintain or experience. Review these tips for assessing your interests, available options, evaluating potential career paths and embracing the reality of your new chosen career.

 

5 Steps for a Successful Career Transition

 

  1. Honestly assess your skills, development plan and market value. Outline your career progression, successful projects and assignments; highlight your preferred activities and appropriate transferable skills. Research companies that share your core values and that could benefit from your skills and experience.

 

  1. Give some thought to what you enjoyed most in your last role. In the event you’re applying for a new role and you’re able to review the job description, look for activities related to the role that excite or repulse you. What activities of your current job do you like and/ or dislike? Are there any activities that give you anxiety as you apply? If so, move on to the next opportunity because you need to associate a pleasant experience with your workday.

 

  1. Consider a challenging role in the same industry. If you are a nurse in a large health system and you prefer a smaller patient load, consider palliative or hospice nursing. In this case, your credentials are the same; you’re just changing your placement in the care continuum. If direct patient care is no longer your preference, there are always management opportunities.

 

  1. Take a risk and look into alternative careers. Research options for career alternatives by exploring industries that require similar credentials and responsibilities so that you are not viewed too green or lacking the preferred experience. Let’s be honest, everyone would love to avoid an entry-level role after 20 years, if they had to make a career transition. Executive recruiters and placement coaches are also useful resources.

 

  1. Upgrade your skills. Look for ways to develop new skills in your current job which would pave the way for a change e.g. offer to write a grant proposal if grant writing is valued in your new field. If your company offers in-house training, sign up for as many classes as you can.

 

Again, while your career goals and aspirations might have changed, you still have the opportunity to attain the success you were experiencing in your former role. A career interruption doesn’t have to be the end of your long-term goals, but it will require a new approach to work and the right attitude.

Style & Travel Daily is also here to assist with your image and career goal needs. Contact us at info@styleandtraveldaily.comand select a service that meets your immediate need. Thanks for viewing the blog and for subscribing in order to join our ongoing Style, Career and Lifestyle conversation. Until next time remember to dress for what’s next!

 

Mark

 

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